Do people really understand Dubplate Culture?!?

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harkaransg
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Do people really understand Dubplate Culture?!?

Post by harkaransg » Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:00 am

Do people really understand Dubplate Culture. As soon a record gets played for the first time, people are saying is this gonna get released. Isnt it about enjoying the song at the very moment you hear it. Sometimes the best tracks you hear are the ones you dont know the name of and who made it. If a track never comes out, you can still listen back to the show. You still have the memory in your head. Tracks do get released, people just need to be abit paitent.

Dubplates need to grow, need to be loved or disliked. The rest follows.

Many people think that if a song is made then it must be released. Maybe they just dont understand. WHAT YOUR UNDERSTANDING
Last edited by harkaransg on Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by macphellimey » Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:26 am

Surely hearing a song and reacting to it in such a positive way as to think "when this is released I'll cop it" is a good thing? Shows you've enjoyed to tune so much in that moment that you'd like to enjoy it in all kinds of circumstances? Surely if something stays strictly dubplate and one if forced to remember it only from listening to shows or recorded sets that limits one's potential enjoyment of that tune? If you have a tune on vinyl you can listen to it any way you like, mix it with whatever you like and experience it afresh an infinite number of times. You can even listen to the show you first heard it if you want to remember it. Dubplate culture is good to the extent that it means that DJs are always coming with something fresh but when that tune drops out of their sets and is buried in a crate somewhere, surely it's better that it gets a release so everyone else can continue to enjoy it?

Obviously not every tune made should be released, it wouldn't be financially viable. That's a good thing too, 'cos it means that there's quality control. That said, keeping a good tune strictly on dubplate for the sake of dubplate culture is sanctimonious, elitist and absurd.

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Post by the wiggle baron » Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:31 am

MacPhellimey wrote:That said, keeping a good tune strictly on dubplate for the sake of dubplate culture is sanctimonious, elitist and absurd.
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Post by harkaransg » Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:42 am

MacPhellimey wrote:Surely hearing a song and reacting to it in such a positive way as to think "when this is released I'll cop it" is a good thing? Shows you've enjoyed to tune so much in that moment that you'd like to enjoy it in all kinds of circumstances? Surely if something stays strictly dubplate and one if forced to remember it only from listening to shows or recorded sets that limits one's potential enjoyment of that tune? If you have a tune on vinyl you can listen to it any way you like, mix it with whatever you like and experience it afresh an infinite number of times. You can even listen to the show you first heard it if you want to remember it. Dubplate culture is good to the extent that it means that DJs are always coming with something fresh but when that tune drops out of their sets and is buried in a crate somewhere, surely it's better that it gets a release so everyone else can continue to enjoy it?

Obviously not every tune made should be released, it wouldn't be financially viable. That's a good thing too, 'cos it means that there's quality control. That said, keeping a good tune strictly on dubplate for the sake of dubplate culture is sanctimonious, elitist and absurd.
Totally agree, however not everyone understands this

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Post by sully_shanks » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:42 pm

dubs give DJs identity n sense of individuality to their performance. and also push people to dig out their own hidden gems n signiture tunes, or better yet push ppl to make their own. no need for every sick track to get full presses...

the whole throwaway, transient nature of dubs isnt so positive tho. real tunes have a sense of timelessness n a scene built on tracks with a 1 month lifespan aint too healthy imo.

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Post by electric eliminator » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:46 pm

Does anyone else get annoyed with people snapping your dubs on a moblie phone to find out what they are? Whats wrong with saying to the dj, thats wicked, whats it called, who did it?

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Post by thomas » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:50 pm

electric eliminator wrote:Does anyone else get annoyed with people snapping your dubs on a moblie phone to find out what they are? Whats wrong with saying to the dj, thats wicked, whats it called, who did it?
Never noticed this, do you mean taking photos of the deck or recording the noise?

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Post by elgato » Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:58 pm

MacPhellimey wrote:Surely hearing a song and reacting to it in such a positive way as to think "when this is released I'll cop it" is a good thing? Shows you've enjoyed to tune so much in that moment that you'd like to enjoy it in all kinds of circumstances? Surely if something stays strictly dubplate and one if forced to remember it only from listening to shows or recorded sets that limits one's potential enjoyment of that tune? If you have a tune on vinyl you can listen to it any way you like, mix it with whatever you like and experience it afresh an infinite number of times. You can even listen to the show you first heard it if you want to remember it. Dubplate culture is good to the extent that it means that DJs are always coming with something fresh but when that tune drops out of their sets and is buried in a crate somewhere, surely it's better that it gets a release so everyone else can continue to enjoy it?

Obviously not every tune made should be released, it wouldn't be financially viable. That's a good thing too, 'cos it means that there's quality control. That said, keeping a good tune strictly on dubplate for the sake of dubplate culture is sanctimonious, elitist and absurd.
i don't see why there is a necessary relationship between ownership and value... in many senses i've found that having certain tracks which mean a lot to me personally on vinyl have even detracted from the enjoyment i get from that piece of music... it becomes a tangible commodity, wheras before it was something much more abstract, which i enjoyed more

furthermore, why, just because people want something, should they necessarily get it? in the exact form that they want it. to impose such an idea on an artist is what i would say is absurd, as if they have a duty to everyone to mass produce their music... surely they should have the creative choice as to how their art is experienced?

sully on the mark with his comments regarding the impact it has on the music's development also

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Post by psycho » Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:03 pm

MacPhellimey wrote: That said, keeping a good tune strictly on dubplate for the sake of dubplate culture is sanctimonious, elitist and absurd.
I don't think any producer wants his track strictly on dubplate. If you're satisfied with your production, you want it to be released, right? And if someone chooses to keep one of his/her tracks only on dubplate to keep it as a special part of their dj set, then it's their choice and i wouldn't call it elitist!
electric eliminator wrote:Does anyone else get annoyed with people snapping your dubs on a moblie phone to find out what they are? Whats wrong with saying to the dj, thats wicked, whats it called, who did it?
nothing wrong with that as long as they don't ask it right in the middle of a mix :)
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Post by macphellimey » Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:16 pm

elgato wrote:
MacPhellimey wrote:Surely hearing a song and reacting to it in such a positive way as to think "when this is released I'll cop it" is a good thing? Shows you've enjoyed to tune so much in that moment that you'd like to enjoy it in all kinds of circumstances? Surely if something stays strictly dubplate and one if forced to remember it only from listening to shows or recorded sets that limits one's potential enjoyment of that tune? If you have a tune on vinyl you can listen to it any way you like, mix it with whatever you like and experience it afresh an infinite number of times. You can even listen to the show you first heard it if you want to remember it. Dubplate culture is good to the extent that it means that DJs are always coming with something fresh but when that tune drops out of their sets and is buried in a crate somewhere, surely it's better that it gets a release so everyone else can continue to enjoy it?

Obviously not every tune made should be released, it wouldn't be financially viable. That's a good thing too, 'cos it means that there's quality control. That said, keeping a good tune strictly on dubplate for the sake of dubplate culture is sanctimonious, elitist and absurd.
i don't see why there is a necessary relationship between ownership and value... in many senses i've found that having certain tracks which mean a lot to me personally on vinyl have even detracted from the enjoyment i get from that piece of music... it becomes a tangible commodity, wheras before it was something much more abstract, which i enjoyed more

furthermore, why, just because people want something, should they necessarily get it? in the exact form that they want it. to impose such an idea on an artist is what i would say is absurd, as if they have a duty to everyone to mass produce their music... surely they should have the creative choice as to how their art is experienced?

sully on the mark with his comments regarding the impact it has on the music's development also

Sorry if I chose my words poorly, I never meant to imply that there's a necessary relation between the enjoyment one gets from a tune and owning it, just that if one does own a tune one is presented with the opportunity to enjoy that tune in a multitude of other ways. If a tune stay strictly on dubplate you'll only ever be able to enjoy it through a particular DJs sets. I must say, I have never found that I've enjoyed a tune less once I've bought it but that's a personally observation.

Nor was I saying that an artist has an obligation to give the public what they want or compromise their artistic integrity and release tunes that they don’t think should be released. I was rather trying to point out that not releasing a tune merely for the sake of propagating a culture wherein music is available to certain people and not others is questionable, as a motivation. I’m all for artists releasing only tunes that they feel represent them and are proud of but that’s not really what we’re discussing here. Take “lemon” by Skream, for example. It’s clearly a tune he is proud of, he used to open with it all the time (I haven’t seen him in quite a while now so I don’t know if he still does), and he isn’t releasing it in order to preserve it’s uniqueness in his set. Fair enough, but what happens when he stops playing it out? It gets shelved and the rest of us don’t get to enjoy it. Ultimately, it’s up to him whether he releases it, he’s under no obligation to anyone, but to not release something that you’re proud of just so that it can have the “dubplate only” label strikes me as silly.

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Post by boomnoise » Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:22 pm

a more interesting question for me these days is whether or not it matters that people don't necessarily get it.

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Post by alien pimp » Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:50 pm

digital, vinyl, dubplate, released, 12", cd's...
i never understand why people are so focused more on formats and less on content
a tune is sound! the rest is package imo
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Post by alien pimp » Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:51 pm

or i should better say: a tune is emotion...
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Post by slothrop » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:02 pm

MacPhellimey wrote:If a tune stays strictly on dubplate you'll only ever be able to enjoy it through a particular DJs sets. I must say, I have never found that I've enjoyed a tune less once I've bought it but that's a personally observation.

Nor was I saying that an artist has an obligation to give the public what they want or compromise their artistic integrity and release tunes that they don’t think should be released. I was rather trying to point out that not releasing a tune merely for the sake of propagating a culture wherein music is available to certain people and not others is questionable, as a motivation.
I really like the idea of only being able to hear certain tunes by turning up to see a particular DJ in the flesh - it makes the experience much more exciting and special. It's cool when it's a tune taht's totally hot off the press, but it's also cool when it's a big anthem that you know noone else can play. It also keeps some of the focus of the scene on the clubs rather than the record collections, which I think is a good thing.

And yeah, like someone else said, it gives more DJs an incentive to start producing or support smaller and less well known producers, rather than just bashing out whatever's big that week.

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Post by sand leaper » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:08 pm

elgato wrote: i don't see why there is a necessary relationship between ownership and value... in many senses i've found that having certain tracks which mean a lot to me personally on vinyl have even detracted from the enjoyment i get from that piece of music... it becomes a tangible commodity, wheras before it was something much more abstract, which i enjoyed more
People only want what they can't have. Pretty childish, but then again, so is dubplate culture in general to a certain extent.

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Post by kingcannibal » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:40 pm

electric eliminator wrote:Does anyone else get annoyed with people snapping your dubs on a moblie phone to find out what they are? Whats wrong with saying to the dj, thats wicked, whats it called, who did it?
I'd rather be left to get on with dejaying rather then try and work out what this drunken geezer is trying to shout at me OVER & OVER & OVER :wink:

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Post by pangaea » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:54 pm

sully_shanks wrote:dubs give DJs identity n sense of individuality to their performance. and also push people to dig out their own hidden gems n signiture tunes, or better yet push ppl to make their own
i remember that it felt a bit weird to own 'learn' when it was released, just because i'd always associated it with mala playing out!

there are many reasons why a producer may not want a track of theirs released
Last edited by pangaea on Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by relaks » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:55 pm

boomnoise wrote:a more interesting question for me these days is whether or not it matters that people don't necessarily get it.
truth.

also, if I care. I do enjoy how the dubplate thing seems to infuriate people though. Big up the frustrated djs.
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Post by djshiva » Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:32 pm

relaks wrote:
boomnoise wrote:a more interesting question for me these days is whether or not it matters that people don't necessarily get it.
truth.

also, if I care. I do enjoy how the dubplate thing seems to infuriate people though. Big up the frustrated djs.
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Post by ufo over easy » Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:46 pm

boomnoise wrote:a more interesting question for me these days is whether or not it matters that people don't necessarily get it.
my mam always used to say "I WANT DOESN'T GET" :D

having said that I want every tune mala has ever made, now.
Last edited by ufo over easy on Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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