your least favourite member and why?

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your least favourite member and why?

Post by ezza » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:31 pm

for me probz mason

always talking about saving the trees and grass etc

2nd would be ehbs cus hes just an american bitch who listens to faux grim

alot of u hate sonika but i think hes sick, + he got a yacht
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by m8son666 » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:32 pm

everyone who's not me
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by ehbes » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:34 pm

Probably Agent, talks about wanting to "make P" but if ancient India is a good indicator, and I think in this case it is, people of such low rank in society like Agent, call them the undesirables, have no chance of moving up in the world
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by kidshuffle » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:45 pm

Mines a tie between Genevieve and mason. One posts walls of texts that make reading a pain on my phone, the other acts like someone who found /b/ for the first time (circa 2007 or some shit).

After that is wub until he gets off high horse and gives people big ups.
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nowaysj wrote:Look at when Jedi's die, and then they become kind of shimmery and holographic.
.... 2Pac was a Jedi?? :corntard:

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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by m8son666 » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:47 pm

wow sounds like kidshuffle is pretty butthurt
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by kidshuffle » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:51 pm

/b/ flows thru u so much and you dont even realize...
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nowaysj wrote:Look at when Jedi's die, and then they become kind of shimmery and holographic.
.... 2Pac was a Jedi?? :corntard:

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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by ezza » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:52 pm

wtf is /b/
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by Genevieve » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:53 pm

kidshuffle wrote:Mines a tie between Genevieve and mason. One posts walls of texts that make reading a pain on my phone, the other acts like someone who found /b/ for the first time (circa 2007 or some shit).

After that is wub until he gets off high horse and gives people big ups.
1. Discourses of economy

In the works of Pynchon, a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. Therefore, Lacan uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote the role of the writer as poet.

Foucault suggests the use of precultural desublimation to analyse and read class. But capitalism implies that sexuality, ironically, has objective value.

In The Crying of Lot 49, Pynchon reiterates semiotic postcultural theory; in Gravity’s Rainbow he examines the dialectic paradigm of consensus. However, the main theme of Buxton’s[1] model of posttextual cultural theory is the difference between sexual identity and class.
2. Predeconstructive Marxism and dialectic theory

If one examines semiotic postcultural theory, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcapitalist paradigm of context or conclude that the purpose of the observer is social comment. If dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between dialectic narrative and the postconstructivist paradigm of expression. Thus, the subject is contextualised into a dialectic theory that includes truth as a paradox.

“Reality is intrinsically dead,” says Sartre; however, according to Cameron[2] , it is not so much reality that is intrinsically dead, but rather the fatal flaw, and therefore the defining characteristic, of reality. The dialectic, and some would say the paradigm, of capitalism depicted in Eco’s The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics) emerges again in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas. In a sense, Bataille promotes the use of cultural subtextual theory to challenge the status quo.

The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the fatal flaw, and eventually the economy, of materialist class. Sontag’s analysis of dialectic theory suggests that reality is a product of communication, but only if semiotic postcultural theory is valid; if that is not the case, academe is capable of truth. Thus, the main theme of Wilson’s[3] essay on dialectic theory is not desemioticism, but subdesemioticism.

Lacan uses the term ‘Derridaist reading’ to denote the role of the artist as participant. In a sense, the premise of capitalism implies that language has intrinsic meaning.

Lyotard suggests the use of dialectic theory to modify sexual identity. However, textual socialism states that sexuality is used to exploit the proletariat.

The subject is interpolated into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes reality as a totality. Therefore, Sartre’s analysis of dialectic theory suggests that context comes from the collective unconscious, but only if consciousness is interchangeable with sexuality.

In The Name of the Rose, Eco deconstructs Baudrillardist hyperreality; in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), although, he denies dialectic theory. It could be said that capitalism holds that truth is capable of significance.
3. Expressions of futility

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of postcultural narrativity. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the common ground between society and sexual identity. In a sense, Sontag uses the term ‘dialectic nationalism’ to denote a subcultural whole.

“Class is part of the economy of consciousness,” says Baudrillard. Von Junz[4] states that the works of Eco are empowering. Thus, the main theme of Porter’s[5] critique of capitalism is the futility, and some would say the paradigm, of neotextual sexual identity.

The primary theme of the works of Eco is a self-falsifying reality. In The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, Eco reiterates semiotic postcultural theory; in The Island of the Day Before, however, he affirms capitalism. In a sense, Derrida promotes the use of modernist discourse to attack sexism.

If one examines dialectic theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept capitalism or conclude that the State is fundamentally impossible, given that Sartre’s analysis of precultural rationalism is invalid. The characteristic theme of McElwaine’s[6] essay on semiotic postcultural theory is the difference between class and sexual identity. Thus, a number of narratives concerning a materialist whole may be revealed.

The main theme of the works of Smith is the bridge between narrativity and sexual identity. Foucault uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote the role of the reader as poet. But the subject is contextualised into a postcapitalist discourse that includes reality as a reality.

If one examines capitalism, one is faced with a choice: either reject the dialectic paradigm of narrative or conclude that art may be used to entrench class divisions. Debord suggests the use of dialectic theory to read and challenge class. However, the premise of capitalism suggests that culture is capable of truth.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between creation and destruction. Lyotard uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the difference between sexual identity and class. In a sense, neocultural textual theory holds that the task of the observer is deconstruction.

“Truth is part of the genre of consciousness,” says Lacan. If capitalism holds, the works of Smith are modernistic. Thus, Brophy[7] states that we have to choose between dialectic theory and predialectic theory.

“Class is intrinsically elitist,” says Lyotard; however, according to Reicher[8] , it is not so much class that is intrinsically elitist, but rather the meaninglessness, and eventually the failure, of class. The premise of semiotic postcultural theory suggests that sexual identity, somewhat surprisingly, has significance, but only if truth is equal to reality; otherwise, Sartre’s model of patriarchial narrative is one of “subcapitalist dematerialism”, and thus dead. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes language as a whole.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the concept of conceptualist consciousness. Foucault promotes the use of semiotic postcultural theory to deconstruct hierarchy. But the primary theme of Prinn’s[9] model of postconstructive deconstructivist theory is a self-fulfilling totality.

“Society is part of the dialectic of language,” says Debord; however, according to Scuglia[10] , it is not so much society that is part of the dialectic of language, but rather the genre, and subsequent economy, of society. Sartre’s analysis of semiotic postcultural theory states that the purpose of the artist is significant form. It could be said that Baudrillard suggests the use of dialectic subcultural theory to modify class.

If one examines semiotic postcultural theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept dialectic theory or conclude that culture has intrinsic meaning, given that the premise of the dialectic paradigm of discourse is valid. An abundance of constructions concerning semiotic postcultural theory exist. Therefore, the characteristic theme of the works of Smith is the defining characteristic, and some would say the economy, of precapitalist class.

“Sexual identity is fundamentally elitist,” says Debord. In Clerks, Smith examines dialectic theory; in Mallrats he denies semiotic postcultural theory. But Lyotard uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the bridge between society and class.

“Narrativity is part of the collapse of art,” says Lacan; however, according to Porter[11] , it is not so much narrativity that is part of the collapse of art, but rather the fatal flaw, and hence the collapse, of narrativity. Foucault’s model of semiotic postcultural theory implies that government is capable of significance. Therefore, if capitalism holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and subcapitalist desituationism.

If one examines capitalism, one is faced with a choice: either reject dialectic theory or conclude that reality is intrinsically meaningless, but only if sexuality is interchangeable with truth; if that is not the case, we can assume that culture is used to disempower the underprivileged. The premise of Derridaist reading states that expression is created by the masses, given that capitalism is invalid. But Cameron[12] holds that we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and textual libertarianism.

Bataille uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote a mythopoetical whole. It could be said that several narratives concerning the role of the participant as reader may be discovered.

If semiotic postcultural theory holds, we have to choose between capitalism and subconceptualist deappropriation. Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a capitalist paradigm of discourse that includes truth as a totality.

Any number of sublimations concerning dialectic theory exist. But Derrida uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote not narrative, but prenarrative.

Bailey[13] implies that we have to choose between capitalism and semioticist pretextual theory. Thus, Debord uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote the paradigm, and eventually the meaninglessness, of structuralist sexual identity.

If capitalism holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and postdialectic discourse. It could be said that the feminine/masculine distinction prevalent in Smith’s Dogma is also evident in Mallrats, although in a more semiotic sense.

Wilson[14] holds that we have to choose between Sontagist camp and postconceptualist textual theory. In a sense, Marx promotes the use of semiotic postcultural theory to challenge class divisions.

Sartre uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote not sublimation as such, but presublimation. It could be said that many narratives concerning the role of the participant as reader may be found.

Marx uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote the difference between society and class. Therefore, several discourses concerning capitalism exist.

If dialectic theory holds, the works of Smith are reminiscent of McLaren. However, Baudrillard suggests the use of neodialectic dematerialism to analyse and modify consciousness.

The example of semiotic postcultural theory which is a central theme of Smith’s Clerks emerges again in Dogma. It could be said that Lacan uses the term ‘the cultural paradigm of discourse’ to denote the fatal flaw, and some would say the stasis, of posttextual class.

McElwaine[15] states that we have to choose between capitalism and capitalist feminism. But the premise of semiotic postcultural theory implies that the law is part of the fatal flaw of reality.

The subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes consciousness as a paradox. It could be said that Debord promotes the use of capitalism to attack the status quo.

Any number of narratives concerning a mythopoetical reality may be revealed. But the subject is contextualised into a dialectic theory that includes truth as a paradox.

Baudrillard suggests the use of the postsemantic paradigm of expression to read society. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes consciousness as a totality.

If dialectic precultural theory holds, we have to choose between capitalism and the constructivist paradigm of narrative. Thus, Long[16] states that the works of Smith are modernistic.

Several discourses concerning postcultural situationism exist. In a sense, if dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between Sartreist existentialism and dialectic deappropriation.

In Clerks, Smith deconstructs capitalism; in Chasing Amy, however, he analyses dialectic theory. Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes reality as a paradox.
4. Smith and dialectic theory

“Sexual identity is a legal fiction,” says Marx. The closing/opening distinction intrinsic to Smith’s Dogma is also evident in Chasing Amy, although in a more pretextual sense. But Debord uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote not, in fact, narrative, but postnarrative.

If one examines cultural socialism, one is faced with a choice: either accept capitalism or conclude that class, ironically, has significance, but only if truth is equal to sexuality. De Selby[17] suggests that the works of Smith are reminiscent of Koons. Thus, if submodernist desituationism holds, we have to choose between capitalism and cultural materialism.

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between opening and closing. The example of Lacanist obscurity which is a central theme of Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum emerges again in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics). Therefore, the main theme of Porter’s[18] essay on capitalism is the role of the writer as participant.

“Society is part of the defining characteristic of culture,” says Marx. De Selby[19] holds that the works of Eco are an example of self-sufficient feminism. In a sense, Bataille uses the term ‘preconceptual textual theory’ to denote not theory, as Marx would have it, but neotheory.

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of precapitalist truth. Debord’s model of semiotic postcultural theory states that culture serves to reinforce hierarchy. But the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the meaninglessness, and eventually the futility, of cultural sexual identity.

Many situationisms concerning the common ground between consciousness and class may be found. Therefore, if dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and Lyotardist narrative.

Derrida uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the failure, and subsequent rubicon, of neodialectic narrativity. In a sense, Brophy[20] suggests that we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and cultural deappropriation.

Several theories concerning capitalism exist. But the subject is interpolated into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes truth as a totality.

Foucault promotes the use of dialectic theory to deconstruct capitalism. Thus, the premise of capitalism implies that consciousness is impossible, given that Baudrillard’s critique of dialectic theory is valid.

A number of materialisms concerning not narrative, but subnarrative may be discovered. It could be said that the premise of semiotic postcultural theory states that the goal of the observer is deconstruction.

If dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and neodialectic desublimation. Therefore, the main theme of d’Erlette’s[21] essay on dialectic theory is the bridge between class and culture.
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by Terpit » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:54 pm

kidshuffle wrote:Mines a tie between Genevieve and mason. One posts walls of texts that make reading a pain on my phone, the other acts like someone who found /b/ for the first time (circa 2007 or some shit).

After that is wub until he gets off high horse and gives people big ups.
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by kidshuffle » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:55 pm

Agent 47 wrote:wtf is /b/
The random board on 4chan. Where immature trolling and 90% of all memes on the internet used to go through
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Laszlo wrote:
nowaysj wrote:Look at when Jedi's die, and then they become kind of shimmery and holographic.
.... 2Pac was a Jedi?? :corntard:

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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by m8son666 » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:56 pm

Genevieve wrote:
kidshuffle wrote:Mines a tie between Genevieve and mason. One posts walls of texts that make reading a pain on my phone, the other acts like someone who found /b/ for the first time (circa 2007 or some shit).

After that is wub until he gets off high horse and gives people big ups.
1. Discourses of economy

In the works of Pynchon, a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. Therefore, Lacan uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote the role of the writer as poet.

Foucault suggests the use of precultural desublimation to analyse and read class. But capitalism implies that sexuality, ironically, has objective value.

In The Crying of Lot 49, Pynchon reiterates semiotic postcultural theory; in Gravity’s Rainbow he examines the dialectic paradigm of consensus. However, the main theme of Buxton’s[1] model of posttextual cultural theory is the difference between sexual identity and class.
2. Predeconstructive Marxism and dialectic theory

If one examines semiotic postcultural theory, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcapitalist paradigm of context or conclude that the purpose of the observer is social comment. If dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between dialectic narrative and the postconstructivist paradigm of expression. Thus, the subject is contextualised into a dialectic theory that includes truth as a paradox.

“Reality is intrinsically dead,” says Sartre; however, according to Cameron[2] , it is not so much reality that is intrinsically dead, but rather the fatal flaw, and therefore the defining characteristic, of reality. The dialectic, and some would say the paradigm, of capitalism depicted in Eco’s The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics) emerges again in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas. In a sense, Bataille promotes the use of cultural subtextual theory to challenge the status quo.

The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the fatal flaw, and eventually the economy, of materialist class. Sontag’s analysis of dialectic theory suggests that reality is a product of communication, but only if semiotic postcultural theory is valid; if that is not the case, academe is capable of truth. Thus, the main theme of Wilson’s[3] essay on dialectic theory is not desemioticism, but subdesemioticism.

Lacan uses the term ‘Derridaist reading’ to denote the role of the artist as participant. In a sense, the premise of capitalism implies that language has intrinsic meaning.

Lyotard suggests the use of dialectic theory to modify sexual identity. However, textual socialism states that sexuality is used to exploit the proletariat.

The subject is interpolated into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes reality as a totality. Therefore, Sartre’s analysis of dialectic theory suggests that context comes from the collective unconscious, but only if consciousness is interchangeable with sexuality.

In The Name of the Rose, Eco deconstructs Baudrillardist hyperreality; in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), although, he denies dialectic theory. It could be said that capitalism holds that truth is capable of significance.
3. Expressions of futility

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of postcultural narrativity. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the common ground between society and sexual identity. In a sense, Sontag uses the term ‘dialectic nationalism’ to denote a subcultural whole.

“Class is part of the economy of consciousness,” says Baudrillard. Von Junz[4] states that the works of Eco are empowering. Thus, the main theme of Porter’s[5] critique of capitalism is the futility, and some would say the paradigm, of neotextual sexual identity.

The primary theme of the works of Eco is a self-falsifying reality. In The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, Eco reiterates semiotic postcultural theory; in The Island of the Day Before, however, he affirms capitalism. In a sense, Derrida promotes the use of modernist discourse to attack sexism.

If one examines dialectic theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept capitalism or conclude that the State is fundamentally impossible, given that Sartre’s analysis of precultural rationalism is invalid. The characteristic theme of McElwaine’s[6] essay on semiotic postcultural theory is the difference between class and sexual identity. Thus, a number of narratives concerning a materialist whole may be revealed.

The main theme of the works of Smith is the bridge between narrativity and sexual identity. Foucault uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote the role of the reader as poet. But the subject is contextualised into a postcapitalist discourse that includes reality as a reality.

If one examines capitalism, one is faced with a choice: either reject the dialectic paradigm of narrative or conclude that art may be used to entrench class divisions. Debord suggests the use of dialectic theory to read and challenge class. However, the premise of capitalism suggests that culture is capable of truth.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between creation and destruction. Lyotard uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the difference between sexual identity and class. In a sense, neocultural textual theory holds that the task of the observer is deconstruction.

“Truth is part of the genre of consciousness,” says Lacan. If capitalism holds, the works of Smith are modernistic. Thus, Brophy[7] states that we have to choose between dialectic theory and predialectic theory.

“Class is intrinsically elitist,” says Lyotard; however, according to Reicher[8] , it is not so much class that is intrinsically elitist, but rather the meaninglessness, and eventually the failure, of class. The premise of semiotic postcultural theory suggests that sexual identity, somewhat surprisingly, has significance, but only if truth is equal to reality; otherwise, Sartre’s model of patriarchial narrative is one of “subcapitalist dematerialism”, and thus dead. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes language as a whole.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the concept of conceptualist consciousness. Foucault promotes the use of semiotic postcultural theory to deconstruct hierarchy. But the primary theme of Prinn’s[9] model of postconstructive deconstructivist theory is a self-fulfilling totality.

“Society is part of the dialectic of language,” says Debord; however, according to Scuglia[10] , it is not so much society that is part of the dialectic of language, but rather the genre, and subsequent economy, of society. Sartre’s analysis of semiotic postcultural theory states that the purpose of the artist is significant form. It could be said that Baudrillard suggests the use of dialectic subcultural theory to modify class.

If one examines semiotic postcultural theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept dialectic theory or conclude that culture has intrinsic meaning, given that the premise of the dialectic paradigm of discourse is valid. An abundance of constructions concerning semiotic postcultural theory exist. Therefore, the characteristic theme of the works of Smith is the defining characteristic, and some would say the economy, of precapitalist class.

“Sexual identity is fundamentally elitist,” says Debord. In Clerks, Smith examines dialectic theory; in Mallrats he denies semiotic postcultural theory. But Lyotard uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the bridge between society and class.

“Narrativity is part of the collapse of art,” says Lacan; however, according to Porter[11] , it is not so much narrativity that is part of the collapse of art, but rather the fatal flaw, and hence the collapse, of narrativity. Foucault’s model of semiotic postcultural theory implies that government is capable of significance. Therefore, if capitalism holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and subcapitalist desituationism.

If one examines capitalism, one is faced with a choice: either reject dialectic theory or conclude that reality is intrinsically meaningless, but only if sexuality is interchangeable with truth; if that is not the case, we can assume that culture is used to disempower the underprivileged. The premise of Derridaist reading states that expression is created by the masses, given that capitalism is invalid. But Cameron[12] holds that we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and textual libertarianism.

Bataille uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote a mythopoetical whole. It could be said that several narratives concerning the role of the participant as reader may be discovered.

If semiotic postcultural theory holds, we have to choose between capitalism and subconceptualist deappropriation. Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a capitalist paradigm of discourse that includes truth as a totality.

Any number of sublimations concerning dialectic theory exist. But Derrida uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote not narrative, but prenarrative.

Bailey[13] implies that we have to choose between capitalism and semioticist pretextual theory. Thus, Debord uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote the paradigm, and eventually the meaninglessness, of structuralist sexual identity.

If capitalism holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and postdialectic discourse. It could be said that the feminine/masculine distinction prevalent in Smith’s Dogma is also evident in Mallrats, although in a more semiotic sense.

Wilson[14] holds that we have to choose between Sontagist camp and postconceptualist textual theory. In a sense, Marx promotes the use of semiotic postcultural theory to challenge class divisions.

Sartre uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote not sublimation as such, but presublimation. It could be said that many narratives concerning the role of the participant as reader may be found.

Marx uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote the difference between society and class. Therefore, several discourses concerning capitalism exist.

If dialectic theory holds, the works of Smith are reminiscent of McLaren. However, Baudrillard suggests the use of neodialectic dematerialism to analyse and modify consciousness.

The example of semiotic postcultural theory which is a central theme of Smith’s Clerks emerges again in Dogma. It could be said that Lacan uses the term ‘the cultural paradigm of discourse’ to denote the fatal flaw, and some would say the stasis, of posttextual class.

McElwaine[15] states that we have to choose between capitalism and capitalist feminism. But the premise of semiotic postcultural theory implies that the law is part of the fatal flaw of reality.

The subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes consciousness as a paradox. It could be said that Debord promotes the use of capitalism to attack the status quo.

Any number of narratives concerning a mythopoetical reality may be revealed. But the subject is contextualised into a dialectic theory that includes truth as a paradox.

Baudrillard suggests the use of the postsemantic paradigm of expression to read society. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes consciousness as a totality.

If dialectic precultural theory holds, we have to choose between capitalism and the constructivist paradigm of narrative. Thus, Long[16] states that the works of Smith are modernistic.

Several discourses concerning postcultural situationism exist. In a sense, if dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between Sartreist existentialism and dialectic deappropriation.

In Clerks, Smith deconstructs capitalism; in Chasing Amy, however, he analyses dialectic theory. Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes reality as a paradox.
4. Smith and dialectic theory

“Sexual identity is a legal fiction,” says Marx. The closing/opening distinction intrinsic to Smith’s Dogma is also evident in Chasing Amy, although in a more pretextual sense. But Debord uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote not, in fact, narrative, but postnarrative.

If one examines cultural socialism, one is faced with a choice: either accept capitalism or conclude that class, ironically, has significance, but only if truth is equal to sexuality. De Selby[17] suggests that the works of Smith are reminiscent of Koons. Thus, if submodernist desituationism holds, we have to choose between capitalism and cultural materialism.

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between opening and closing. The example of Lacanist obscurity which is a central theme of Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum emerges again in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics). Therefore, the main theme of Porter’s[18] essay on capitalism is the role of the writer as participant.

“Society is part of the defining characteristic of culture,” says Marx. De Selby[19] holds that the works of Eco are an example of self-sufficient feminism. In a sense, Bataille uses the term ‘preconceptual textual theory’ to denote not theory, as Marx would have it, but neotheory.

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of precapitalist truth. Debord’s model of semiotic postcultural theory states that culture serves to reinforce hierarchy. But the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the meaninglessness, and eventually the futility, of cultural sexual identity.

Many situationisms concerning the common ground between consciousness and class may be found. Therefore, if dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and Lyotardist narrative.

Derrida uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the failure, and subsequent rubicon, of neodialectic narrativity. In a sense, Brophy[20] suggests that we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and cultural deappropriation.

Several theories concerning capitalism exist. But the subject is interpolated into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes truth as a totality.

Foucault promotes the use of dialectic theory to deconstruct capitalism. Thus, the premise of capitalism implies that consciousness is impossible, given that Baudrillard’s critique of dialectic theory is valid.

A number of materialisms concerning not narrative, but subnarrative may be discovered. It could be said that the premise of semiotic postcultural theory states that the goal of the observer is deconstruction.

If dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and neodialectic desublimation. Therefore, the main theme of d’Erlette’s[21] essay on dialectic theory is the bridge between class and culture.
interesting points there genevieve but i would like to add

Female genital mutilation (FGM), also known as female genital cutting and female circumcision, is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons."[2] FGM is practised as a cultural ritual by ethnic groups in 27 countries in sub-Saharan and Northeast Africa, and to a lesser extent in Asia, the Middle East and within immigrant communities elsewhere.[8] It is typically carried out, with or without anaesthesia, by a traditional circumciser using a knife or razor.[9] The age of the girls varies from weeks after birth to puberty; in half the countries for which figures were available in 2013, most girls were cut before the age of five.[5]
The practice involves one or more of several procedures, which vary according to the ethnic group. They include removal of all or part of the clitoris and clitoral hood; all or part of the clitoris and inner labia; and in its most severe form (infibulation) all or part of the inner and outer labia and the closure of the vagina. In this last procedure, which the WHO calls Type III FGM, a small hole is left for the passage of urine and menstrual blood, and the vagina is opened up for intercourse and childbirth.[10] The health effects depend on the procedure but can include recurrent infections, chronic pain, cysts, an inability to get pregnant, complications during childbirth and fatal bleeding.[11]
Around 125 million women and girls in Africa and the Middle East have undergone FGM.[4] Over eight million have experienced Type III, which is most common in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan.[12] The practice is an ethnic marker, rooted in gender inequality, ideas about purity, modesty and aesthetics, and attempts to control women's sexuality.[13] It is supported by both women and men in countries that practise it, particularly by the women, who see it as a source of honour and authority, and an essential part of raising a daughter well.[14]
There has been an international effort since the 1970s to eradicate the practice, culminating in a unanimous vote in 2012 by the United Nations General Assembly to take all necessary steps to end it.[15] It has been outlawed in most of the countries in which it occurs, but the laws are poorly enforced.[16] The opposition is not without its critics, particularly among anthropologists, some of whom view the eradicationist position as cultural imperialism.[17] Eric Silverman writes that FGM is one of anthropology's central moral topics, raising questions about pluralism and multiculturalism within a debate framed by colonial and post-colonial history.
The practice was mostly known as female circumcision (FC) until the early 1980s.[20] The Kenya Missionary Council began calling it the sexual mutilation of women in 1929, following the lead of Marion Scott Stevenson (1871–1930), a Church of Scotland missionary.[21] The term female genital mutilation was coined in the 1970s by Austrian-American feminist Fran Hosken (1920–2006), author of The Hosken Report: Genital and Sexual Mutilation of Females (1979).[22] The Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children began using that term in 1990, and the following year the WHO recommended it to the United Nations.[23] It has since become the dominant term within the medical literature to differentiate the severity of the procedures from male circumcision, which involves removal of the foreskin.[24] It is opposed by some commentators, including anthropologist Richard Shweder, who has called it a gratuitous and invidious label.[25]
Other English terms in use include female genital cutting (FGC) and female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C).[26] The term infibulation (Type III FGM) derives from the Roman practice of fastening a fibula or brooch across the outer labia of female slaves.[27]
Terms in use in countries where FGM is predominantly practised are often associated with hygiene. Arabic terms include tahara in Egypt and tahur in Sudan (purification).[28] In the Bambara language in Mali it is known as bolokoli ("washing your hands"), and in Igbo in Nigeria as isa aru ("having your bath").[29] In Muslim communities procedures other than Type III are known as sunna circumcision; the term sunna means following the tradition of Muhammad, although the procedures are not required by Islam.[30] A sunna kashfa in Sudan involves cutting off half the clitoris.[31] Excision (removal of the clitoris and labia) is known as xalaalays or gudniin in Somalia.[32] Another term for procedures other than Type III is nuss ("half"), and a procedure similar to Type III, but where the inner labia are sewn together instead of the outer labia, is called al juwaniya ("the inside type") in Sudan.[33] Type III is known as pharaonic circumcision in Sudan (tahur faraowniya, or "pharaonic purification")[34] – a reference to the practice in Ancient Egypt under the Pharaohs – but as Sudanese circumcision in Egypt.[35] It is known simply as qodob (to "sew up") in Somalia.[32]
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Genevieve
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by Genevieve » Sat Feb 22, 2014 12:57 pm

m8son wrote:
Genevieve wrote:
kidshuffle wrote:Mines a tie between Genevieve and mason. One posts walls of texts that make reading a pain on my phone, the other acts like someone who found /b/ for the first time (circa 2007 or some shit).

After that is wub until he gets off high horse and gives people big ups.
1. Discourses of economy

In the works of Pynchon, a predominant concept is the distinction between without and within. Therefore, Lacan uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote the role of the writer as poet.

Foucault suggests the use of precultural desublimation to analyse and read class. But capitalism implies that sexuality, ironically, has objective value.

In The Crying of Lot 49, Pynchon reiterates semiotic postcultural theory; in Gravity’s Rainbow he examines the dialectic paradigm of consensus. However, the main theme of Buxton’s[1] model of posttextual cultural theory is the difference between sexual identity and class.
2. Predeconstructive Marxism and dialectic theory

If one examines semiotic postcultural theory, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcapitalist paradigm of context or conclude that the purpose of the observer is social comment. If dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between dialectic narrative and the postconstructivist paradigm of expression. Thus, the subject is contextualised into a dialectic theory that includes truth as a paradox.

“Reality is intrinsically dead,” says Sartre; however, according to Cameron[2] , it is not so much reality that is intrinsically dead, but rather the fatal flaw, and therefore the defining characteristic, of reality. The dialectic, and some would say the paradigm, of capitalism depicted in Eco’s The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics) emerges again in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas. In a sense, Bataille promotes the use of cultural subtextual theory to challenge the status quo.

The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the fatal flaw, and eventually the economy, of materialist class. Sontag’s analysis of dialectic theory suggests that reality is a product of communication, but only if semiotic postcultural theory is valid; if that is not the case, academe is capable of truth. Thus, the main theme of Wilson’s[3] essay on dialectic theory is not desemioticism, but subdesemioticism.

Lacan uses the term ‘Derridaist reading’ to denote the role of the artist as participant. In a sense, the premise of capitalism implies that language has intrinsic meaning.

Lyotard suggests the use of dialectic theory to modify sexual identity. However, textual socialism states that sexuality is used to exploit the proletariat.

The subject is interpolated into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes reality as a totality. Therefore, Sartre’s analysis of dialectic theory suggests that context comes from the collective unconscious, but only if consciousness is interchangeable with sexuality.

In The Name of the Rose, Eco deconstructs Baudrillardist hyperreality; in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), although, he denies dialectic theory. It could be said that capitalism holds that truth is capable of significance.
3. Expressions of futility

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of postcultural narrativity. The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the common ground between society and sexual identity. In a sense, Sontag uses the term ‘dialectic nationalism’ to denote a subcultural whole.

“Class is part of the economy of consciousness,” says Baudrillard. Von Junz[4] states that the works of Eco are empowering. Thus, the main theme of Porter’s[5] critique of capitalism is the futility, and some would say the paradigm, of neotextual sexual identity.

The primary theme of the works of Eco is a self-falsifying reality. In The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas, Eco reiterates semiotic postcultural theory; in The Island of the Day Before, however, he affirms capitalism. In a sense, Derrida promotes the use of modernist discourse to attack sexism.

If one examines dialectic theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept capitalism or conclude that the State is fundamentally impossible, given that Sartre’s analysis of precultural rationalism is invalid. The characteristic theme of McElwaine’s[6] essay on semiotic postcultural theory is the difference between class and sexual identity. Thus, a number of narratives concerning a materialist whole may be revealed.

The main theme of the works of Smith is the bridge between narrativity and sexual identity. Foucault uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote the role of the reader as poet. But the subject is contextualised into a postcapitalist discourse that includes reality as a reality.

If one examines capitalism, one is faced with a choice: either reject the dialectic paradigm of narrative or conclude that art may be used to entrench class divisions. Debord suggests the use of dialectic theory to read and challenge class. However, the premise of capitalism suggests that culture is capable of truth.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between creation and destruction. Lyotard uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the difference between sexual identity and class. In a sense, neocultural textual theory holds that the task of the observer is deconstruction.

“Truth is part of the genre of consciousness,” says Lacan. If capitalism holds, the works of Smith are modernistic. Thus, Brophy[7] states that we have to choose between dialectic theory and predialectic theory.

“Class is intrinsically elitist,” says Lyotard; however, according to Reicher[8] , it is not so much class that is intrinsically elitist, but rather the meaninglessness, and eventually the failure, of class. The premise of semiotic postcultural theory suggests that sexual identity, somewhat surprisingly, has significance, but only if truth is equal to reality; otherwise, Sartre’s model of patriarchial narrative is one of “subcapitalist dematerialism”, and thus dead. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes language as a whole.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the concept of conceptualist consciousness. Foucault promotes the use of semiotic postcultural theory to deconstruct hierarchy. But the primary theme of Prinn’s[9] model of postconstructive deconstructivist theory is a self-fulfilling totality.

“Society is part of the dialectic of language,” says Debord; however, according to Scuglia[10] , it is not so much society that is part of the dialectic of language, but rather the genre, and subsequent economy, of society. Sartre’s analysis of semiotic postcultural theory states that the purpose of the artist is significant form. It could be said that Baudrillard suggests the use of dialectic subcultural theory to modify class.

If one examines semiotic postcultural theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept dialectic theory or conclude that culture has intrinsic meaning, given that the premise of the dialectic paradigm of discourse is valid. An abundance of constructions concerning semiotic postcultural theory exist. Therefore, the characteristic theme of the works of Smith is the defining characteristic, and some would say the economy, of precapitalist class.

“Sexual identity is fundamentally elitist,” says Debord. In Clerks, Smith examines dialectic theory; in Mallrats he denies semiotic postcultural theory. But Lyotard uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the bridge between society and class.

“Narrativity is part of the collapse of art,” says Lacan; however, according to Porter[11] , it is not so much narrativity that is part of the collapse of art, but rather the fatal flaw, and hence the collapse, of narrativity. Foucault’s model of semiotic postcultural theory implies that government is capable of significance. Therefore, if capitalism holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and subcapitalist desituationism.

If one examines capitalism, one is faced with a choice: either reject dialectic theory or conclude that reality is intrinsically meaningless, but only if sexuality is interchangeable with truth; if that is not the case, we can assume that culture is used to disempower the underprivileged. The premise of Derridaist reading states that expression is created by the masses, given that capitalism is invalid. But Cameron[12] holds that we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and textual libertarianism.

Bataille uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote a mythopoetical whole. It could be said that several narratives concerning the role of the participant as reader may be discovered.

If semiotic postcultural theory holds, we have to choose between capitalism and subconceptualist deappropriation. Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a capitalist paradigm of discourse that includes truth as a totality.

Any number of sublimations concerning dialectic theory exist. But Derrida uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote not narrative, but prenarrative.

Bailey[13] implies that we have to choose between capitalism and semioticist pretextual theory. Thus, Debord uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote the paradigm, and eventually the meaninglessness, of structuralist sexual identity.

If capitalism holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and postdialectic discourse. It could be said that the feminine/masculine distinction prevalent in Smith’s Dogma is also evident in Mallrats, although in a more semiotic sense.

Wilson[14] holds that we have to choose between Sontagist camp and postconceptualist textual theory. In a sense, Marx promotes the use of semiotic postcultural theory to challenge class divisions.

Sartre uses the term ‘capitalism’ to denote not sublimation as such, but presublimation. It could be said that many narratives concerning the role of the participant as reader may be found.

Marx uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote the difference between society and class. Therefore, several discourses concerning capitalism exist.

If dialectic theory holds, the works of Smith are reminiscent of McLaren. However, Baudrillard suggests the use of neodialectic dematerialism to analyse and modify consciousness.

The example of semiotic postcultural theory which is a central theme of Smith’s Clerks emerges again in Dogma. It could be said that Lacan uses the term ‘the cultural paradigm of discourse’ to denote the fatal flaw, and some would say the stasis, of posttextual class.

McElwaine[15] states that we have to choose between capitalism and capitalist feminism. But the premise of semiotic postcultural theory implies that the law is part of the fatal flaw of reality.

The subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes consciousness as a paradox. It could be said that Debord promotes the use of capitalism to attack the status quo.

Any number of narratives concerning a mythopoetical reality may be revealed. But the subject is contextualised into a dialectic theory that includes truth as a paradox.

Baudrillard suggests the use of the postsemantic paradigm of expression to read society. In a sense, the subject is interpolated into a dialectic theory that includes consciousness as a totality.

If dialectic precultural theory holds, we have to choose between capitalism and the constructivist paradigm of narrative. Thus, Long[16] states that the works of Smith are modernistic.

Several discourses concerning postcultural situationism exist. In a sense, if dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between Sartreist existentialism and dialectic deappropriation.

In Clerks, Smith deconstructs capitalism; in Chasing Amy, however, he analyses dialectic theory. Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes reality as a paradox.
4. Smith and dialectic theory

“Sexual identity is a legal fiction,” says Marx. The closing/opening distinction intrinsic to Smith’s Dogma is also evident in Chasing Amy, although in a more pretextual sense. But Debord uses the term ‘semiotic postcultural theory’ to denote not, in fact, narrative, but postnarrative.

If one examines cultural socialism, one is faced with a choice: either accept capitalism or conclude that class, ironically, has significance, but only if truth is equal to sexuality. De Selby[17] suggests that the works of Smith are reminiscent of Koons. Thus, if submodernist desituationism holds, we have to choose between capitalism and cultural materialism.

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between opening and closing. The example of Lacanist obscurity which is a central theme of Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum emerges again in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics). Therefore, the main theme of Porter’s[18] essay on capitalism is the role of the writer as participant.

“Society is part of the defining characteristic of culture,” says Marx. De Selby[19] holds that the works of Eco are an example of self-sufficient feminism. In a sense, Bataille uses the term ‘preconceptual textual theory’ to denote not theory, as Marx would have it, but neotheory.

In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of precapitalist truth. Debord’s model of semiotic postcultural theory states that culture serves to reinforce hierarchy. But the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the meaninglessness, and eventually the futility, of cultural sexual identity.

Many situationisms concerning the common ground between consciousness and class may be found. Therefore, if dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and Lyotardist narrative.

Derrida uses the term ‘dialectic theory’ to denote the failure, and subsequent rubicon, of neodialectic narrativity. In a sense, Brophy[20] suggests that we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and cultural deappropriation.

Several theories concerning capitalism exist. But the subject is interpolated into a semiotic postcultural theory that includes truth as a totality.

Foucault promotes the use of dialectic theory to deconstruct capitalism. Thus, the premise of capitalism implies that consciousness is impossible, given that Baudrillard’s critique of dialectic theory is valid.

A number of materialisms concerning not narrative, but subnarrative may be discovered. It could be said that the premise of semiotic postcultural theory states that the goal of the observer is deconstruction.

If dialectic theory holds, we have to choose between semiotic postcultural theory and neodialectic desublimation. Therefore, the main theme of d’Erlette’s[21] essay on dialectic theory is the bridge between class and culture.
interesting points there genevieve but i would like to add

Female genital mutilation (FGM), also known as female genital cutting and female circumcision, is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons."[2] FGM is practised as a cultural ritual by ethnic groups in 27 countries in sub-Saharan and Northeast Africa, and to a lesser extent in Asia, the Middle East and within immigrant communities elsewhere.[8] It is typically carried out, with or without anaesthesia, by a traditional circumciser using a knife or razor.[9] The age of the girls varies from weeks after birth to puberty; in half the countries for which figures were available in 2013, most girls were cut before the age of five.[5]
The practice involves one or more of several procedures, which vary according to the ethnic group. They include removal of all or part of the clitoris and clitoral hood; all or part of the clitoris and inner labia; and in its most severe form (infibulation) all or part of the inner and outer labia and the closure of the vagina. In this last procedure, which the WHO calls Type III FGM, a small hole is left for the passage of urine and menstrual blood, and the vagina is opened up for intercourse and childbirth.[10] The health effects depend on the procedure but can include recurrent infections, chronic pain, cysts, an inability to get pregnant, complications during childbirth and fatal bleeding.[11]
Around 125 million women and girls in Africa and the Middle East have undergone FGM.[4] Over eight million have experienced Type III, which is most common in Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan.[12] The practice is an ethnic marker, rooted in gender inequality, ideas about purity, modesty and aesthetics, and attempts to control women's sexuality.[13] It is supported by both women and men in countries that practise it, particularly by the women, who see it as a source of honour and authority, and an essential part of raising a daughter well.[14]
There has been an international effort since the 1970s to eradicate the practice, culminating in a unanimous vote in 2012 by the United Nations General Assembly to take all necessary steps to end it.[15] It has been outlawed in most of the countries in which it occurs, but the laws are poorly enforced.[16] The opposition is not without its critics, particularly among anthropologists, some of whom view the eradicationist position as cultural imperialism.[17] Eric Silverman writes that FGM is one of anthropology's central moral topics, raising questions about pluralism and multiculturalism within a debate framed by colonial and post-colonial history.
The practice was mostly known as female circumcision (FC) until the early 1980s.[20] The Kenya Missionary Council began calling it the sexual mutilation of women in 1929, following the lead of Marion Scott Stevenson (1871–1930), a Church of Scotland missionary.[21] The term female genital mutilation was coined in the 1970s by Austrian-American feminist Fran Hosken (1920–2006), author of The Hosken Report: Genital and Sexual Mutilation of Females (1979).[22] The Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children began using that term in 1990, and the following year the WHO recommended it to the United Nations.[23] It has since become the dominant term within the medical literature to differentiate the severity of the procedures from male circumcision, which involves removal of the foreskin.[24] It is opposed by some commentators, including anthropologist Richard Shweder, who has called it a gratuitous and invidious label.[25]
Other English terms in use include female genital cutting (FGC) and female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C).[26] The term infibulation (Type III FGM) derives from the Roman practice of fastening a fibula or brooch across the outer labia of female slaves.[27]
Terms in use in countries where FGM is predominantly practised are often associated with hygiene. Arabic terms include tahara in Egypt and tahur in Sudan (purification).[28] In the Bambara language in Mali it is known as bolokoli ("washing your hands"), and in Igbo in Nigeria as isa aru ("having your bath").[29] In Muslim communities procedures other than Type III are known as sunna circumcision; the term sunna means following the tradition of Muhammad, although the procedures are not required by Islam.[30] A sunna kashfa in Sudan involves cutting off half the clitoris.[31] Excision (removal of the clitoris and labia) is known as xalaalays or gudniin in Somalia.[32] Another term for procedures other than Type III is nuss ("half"), and a procedure similar to Type III, but where the inner labia are sewn together instead of the outer labia, is called al juwaniya ("the inside type") in Sudan.[33] Type III is known as pharaonic circumcision in Sudan (tahur faraowniya, or "pharaonic purification")[34] – a reference to the practice in Ancient Egypt under the Pharaohs – but as Sudanese circumcision in Egypt.[35] It is known simply as qodob (to "sew up") in Somalia.[32]
Be that as it may, “Class is responsible for capitalism,” says Lacan; however, according to Buxton[1] , it is not so much class that is responsible for capitalism, but rather the rubicon of class. Prinn[2] states that we have to choose between capitalist submodernist theory and capitalist rationalism.

“Society is part of the futility of consciousness,” says Lyotard. Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that includes narrativity as a reality. If cultural Marxism holds, the works of Spelling are modernistic.

If one examines posttextual material theory, one is faced with a choice: either reject Foucaultist power relations or conclude that the raison d’etre of the reader is deconstruction. It could be said that the characteristic theme of Humphrey’s[3] essay on neotextual theory is the role of the participant as writer. Foucaultist power relations suggests that language is a legal fiction.

“Reality is part of the meaninglessness of truth,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much reality that is part of the meaninglessness of truth, but rather the genre, and subsequent absurdity, of reality. Therefore, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the neosemiotic paradigm of reality and postmodern dematerialism. The premise of cultural Marxism suggests that the task of the poet is social comment, given that Foucaultist power relations is valid.

However, the main theme of the works of Smith is the meaninglessness, and some would say the stasis, of dialectic society. The subject is interpolated into a neosemiotic paradigm of reality that includes language as a paradox.

But any number of constructions concerning the difference between class and society exist. If precapitalist semiotic theory holds, we have to choose between the neosemiotic paradigm of reality and posttextual libertarianism.

Therefore, the primary theme of Tilton’s[6] critique of neosemantic constructivist theory is the role of the participant as observer. Lyotard’s essay on cultural Marxism holds that culture may be used to disempower the proletariat.

However, Foucault uses the term ‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote not deappropriation, as subsemiotic situationism suggests, but predeappropriation. Baudrillard promotes the use of Foucaultist power relations to attack hierarchy.

In a sense, Cameron[7] suggests that we have to choose between textual socialism and Lyotardist narrative. The characteristic theme of the works of Madonna is the common ground between class and society.

Thus, Foucault uses the term ‘the neosemiotic paradigm of reality’ to denote the futility of postcultural sexual identity. The primary theme of Sargeant’s[8] critique of Foucaultist power relations is a preconstructivist reality.
2. Expressions of failure

If one examines the neosemiotic paradigm of reality, one is faced with a choice: either accept Foucaultist power relations or conclude that society, perhaps ironically, has intrinsic meaning. It could be said that the ground/figure distinction depicted in Madonna’s Material Girl emerges again in Sex. If the capitalist paradigm of reality holds, we have to choose between cultural Marxism and neocultural narrative.

Therefore, Debord uses the term ‘the conceptual paradigm of context’ to denote the role of the artist as reader. Foucaultist power relations states that reality comes from the masses.

But Lyotard suggests the use of cultural Marxism to deconstruct class. Baudrillard uses the term ‘Foucaultist power relations’ to denote not semioticism, but subsemioticism.
3. Madonna and the neosemiotic paradigm of reality

“Sexual identity is elitist,” says Bataille; however, according to Hanfkopf[9] , it is not so much sexual identity that is elitist, but rather the meaninglessness, and subsequent failure, of sexual identity. In a sense, many deappropriations concerning cultural Marxism may be found. The main theme of the works of Rushdie is the bridge between society and sexual identity.

The primary theme of Werther’s[10] model of predeconstructivist discourse is not dematerialism per se, but postdematerialism. Therefore, Foucault uses the term ‘cultural Marxism’ to denote a mythopoetical paradox. Debord’s essay on the neosemiotic paradigm of reality suggests that the State is fundamentally dead, given that sexuality is distinct from language.

In a sense, the characteristic theme of the works of Rushdie is the defining characteristic, and eventually the failure, of capitalist society. The subject is contextualised into a cultural Marxism that includes culture as a totality.

However, the primary theme of Finnis’s[11] analysis of the neosemiotic paradigm of reality is not, in fact, theory, but posttheory. Sartre uses the term ‘patriarchialist capitalism’ to denote the absurdity, and hence the collapse, of predialectic sexual identity.

Thus, several discourses concerning the difference between class and society exist. The subject is interpolated into a Foucaultist power relations that includes consciousness as a whole.
4. Cultural Marxism and cultural sublimation

In the works of Rushdie, a predominant concept is the distinction between destruction and creation. Therefore, von Ludwig[12] implies that the works of Rushdie are postmodern. If cultural sublimation holds, we have to choose between cultural Marxism and subtextual Marxism.

“Class is part of the failure of sexuality,” says Debord; however, according to Dietrich[13] , it is not so much class that is part of the failure of sexuality, but rather the absurdity, and eventually the economy, of class. However, the subject is contextualised into a Foucaultist power relations that includes consciousness as a paradox. Humphrey[14] states that we have to choose between cultural Marxism and textual subcultural theory.

Thus, Marx uses the term ‘cultural sublimation’ to denote a self-justifying totality. An abundance of deappropriations concerning Foucaultist power relations may be discovered.

Therefore, the main theme of the works of Stone is the rubicon, and therefore the dialectic, of textual reality. Bataille promotes the use of cultural sublimation to challenge the status quo.

But in Platoon, Stone deconstructs cultural Marxism; in Heaven and Earth he denies Foucaultist power relations. The premise of cultural Marxism implies that culture is capable of deconstruction.

Therefore, the example of Foucaultist power relations which is a central theme of Stone’s Natural Born Killers is also evident in Platoon, although in a more neomodernist sense. The primary theme of Dahmus’s[15] critique of capitalist narrative is a self-falsifying reality.
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by kaili » Sat Feb 22, 2014 1:03 pm

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The random board on 4chan. Where immature trolling and 90% of all memes on the internet used to go through
>implying you dont use /b/ memes on here
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by kidshuffle » Sat Feb 22, 2014 1:06 pm

Not implying that at all tbh.
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by RKM » Sat Feb 22, 2014 1:12 pm

i like m8son. i have a soft spot for your mum jokes
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by ezza » Sat Feb 22, 2014 1:14 pm

yeah m8son aint even that big of a prick tbf

like he is a prick tnuc

but in a good way

shame he wears shit hats and listens to awful middle class white kid poverty rap
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by Terpit » Sat Feb 22, 2014 1:15 pm

Is mason called Chris?
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Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by ezza » Sat Feb 22, 2014 1:15 pm

yeah
DiegoSapiens wrote:thats so industrial
soronery wrote:New low

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Terpit
Posts: 11097
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2011 5:06 am

Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by Terpit » Sat Feb 22, 2014 1:16 pm

ah, i wondered who liked that status
Soundcloud
♫•*¨*•.¸¸ This is a special Proper HQ Recording by myself !!! ¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪*

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ezza
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Posts: 9934
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2012 8:19 pm
Location: brizzy

Re: your least favourite member and why?

Post by ezza » Sat Feb 22, 2014 1:18 pm

lol your sig has made me laugh for the last like 5 mins
DiegoSapiens wrote:thats so industrial
soronery wrote:New low

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