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Postby futures_untold » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:37 am

Choosing whether or not to study audio?

Greetings fellow DSF members.

Choosing whether to study at college or university can be a difficult choice.

To help those with an interest in music decide if they wish to study audio, I've compiled a list of work roles related to the audio industry. I've also quoted other members of Dubstepforum who provide arguements both for and against the need to study audio.

Finally, further related information and opinions can be found in the threads listed at the very bottom of the post.

I hope you'll find this post useful and that you share your opinions on the subject with us today.

Patrick

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In summary

While some people advocate getting an education in music, others advocate independently learning in your spare time.

There are many considerations which must be accounted for when choosing a career path related to the audio industry. This includes the direct effect that technology is having on the audio industry, and also cultural shifts in consumer thinking, i.e, free downlolads vs paid albums etc.

People in none music related fields still regularly become sucessful musicians. At the same time, people who have a degree in audio recording often end up working regular jobs to make ends meet.

Perhaps the most significant choice to make relates to the lifestyle you wish to lead. For some lively people, being a performing artist or roadie is fine. For more modest people, other roles such as the office based support roles are preferable.

Whichever choices you make about working with audio, gaining an education is always useful (if potentially expensive).

Each profession needs a specific skillset. While everyone has access to musical instruments and recording equipment (internet, cheap pc's & soundcards), not everyone has the education necessary to work in the advanced audio fields.

Finally, remember that the education you may recieve is not the ending point in your career path. Changing careers is always possible at any time, regardless of the levels of education achieved to date or the new career path you decide to follow.

Good luck and have fun!


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Some work roles within the audio industry

Studio artist
Touring artist (not exclusive with the profession listed above)
Session Musician
Band musician
Singer (Choir/opera)
Director
Songwriter
Producer
Recording engineer
Mastering engineer
Duplication engineer (Mastering & duplication of CD's & vinyl)
Live sound engineer (Live gigs, festivals, theatre & events)
TV & radio broadcasting engineer
Radio DJ
Club DJ
Private hire DJ
Promoter
Club/sound system owner
Festival organiser/events manager
Roadie
Artist Management
Copyright management (Performing Rights Society [UK])
Label owner
Sound designer (Folley sounds, sample bank collections)
Sound artiste (avant garde 'out their' stuff)
Commercials & radio jingles producer
Producer for TV shows, film & multimedia (games)
Sound engineer for film (Boom operator, field sound tech person)
Music sales (cds, mp3s & vinyl)
Sheet music sales
Music tech sales [hardware & software both web & bricks & mortar])
Instrument hire
Music gear repair (piano tuning, fixing old Moogs etc)
Hardware developer
Software Developer
Acoustic engineer (preparing audio environments with acoustic treatments [clubs, studios])
Industrial audio engineer (helping heavy industry manage sound from heavy machinery etc)
University/scientific researcher within the acoustic field
Telecoms engineer (telephony, communications devices [TV, hifi units, Voice Over Internet Protocol, satallites etc] military comms {cryptography, field devices, ECM, audio weapons R&D)
Linguistics & Philology (Involving field work for research)
Audiologist (Working in hospitals testing hearing and fitting audio devices)
Speech therapist
Music teacher
Youth arts worker
Accountant
Lawyer
Media buyer
Schedule organiser
Graphic Designer
Photographer
Videographer
Dancer
Duplication plant worker
Coach driver
Caterer

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Some questions to ask yourself

Do you have the money to study full time?

Do you have the patience to study full time?

Do you have the skills to study at the higher standards expected at university?

With the decline of music sales due to technological and cultural shifts, how realistic do you think it is to become a successful artist with world tours, colossal album sales and continous airplay?

What are your personal lifestyle preferences? (Loud, lively & late vs reserved, steady and regular)

Do you like to stay up late, travel a lot, meet lots of new people and enjoy being in a very noisy environment?

Do you prefer to remain grounded within your locality, work from an office, studio or home, have regular pay checks, have to travel less and be in a quieter environment?

Is music just a passing passion & interest, or have you known for a long time intuitevely that you've always wanted to work in the audio industry?

Do you have any other commitments which could effect your ability to study full time?

---------------------------------------------------

Reasons in favour of studying audio

Hurtdeer wrote:If you want to simply study music for the sake of learning about it, then do a music course!

What I have gotten out of it is exposure to understanding and forms of music I would have probably otherwise ignored, a chance to explore various composition methods and play different styles of music in different bands until I found what I liked, and some great contacts and friends.

I don't regret it at all.


HAACK wrote:Yhe I agree with Sharmaji, even if it isn't your career path you can still get a lot of knowledge that you wouldn't get form a book. I recently took an introductory course at my college in audio production, this helped me clarify so many questions and gave me a lot more tips that like I said you will not find in a book!

Plus you get to meet people that share similar interests and this makes for good connections in the future.


setspeed wrote:You really need to think about what it is you want to be doing in the industry, and act accordingly.

i wouldn't say it's necessarily a bad thing to do a music tech degree - although I did one and basically wasted my time - but if I was going into it now here is what i would do.

1. don't just do your assignments and think that will do.

2. remember that you have free access to some really nice gear. get in the studios and cane it, every minute you can; figure out how things work, get the studio manager guy to come down and show you how to use this desk or that microphone. when you finish the course, all this will disappear so use it while you can.

3. don't spend 3 years drinking and taking recreational drugs. there will be plenty of time for that later. you might feel like a nerd going in the studio on a saturday while all your mates are still drinking from the night before, but it's very hard to get into the industry and only 1 or 2 people out of the 50-odd on your course will manage it. i can tell you now, they will be the ones who worked hardest, became the best engineers and know the equipment better than anyone else. me? i went straight into a call centre.

4. record and produce everything you can. if some band are playing a gig, ask if you can record them live or engineer them, or see if you can record people's demos, whatever. it doesn't matter if you hate the music - if you get a job working in a studio you'll spend half your time working on music you don't like so get used to it. you need the experience - no one will give you a job if you can write a great dubstep tune but can't mic up a drumkit.

5. get making moves on other stuff while you're there. start a club night with a couple of mates, start a little record label, get a music blog going, write tunes, you never know where things will end up.

if you do all that, it'll probably be worth it doing a music tech degree. if you just want to write tunes and get them released, i'm not sure if i would bother...

---------------------------------------------------

Reasons against studying audio

futures_untold wrote:1> Fuck all of the above.

2> Choose a sensible subject.

The following subjects will be useful for makeing a real living in music.

-Business & Marketing

-Law (specialising in Contract Law)

-Electronic Engineering (specialising in audio applications)

-Computing (specialising in DSP coding)

-Hospitality and Events Management (cuz your name isn't Micheal Eavis).

-Graphic Design (Someone has to build those lovely Flash widgets that play your opus creations on your Myspace page)

-Printing (Someone has to print all you flyers & merchandise don't ya know..!??)

While you're studying a subject that gives you real skills, you can still learn to produce in your spare time and become the next big thing.

Ask yourself these simple questions.

1>Who makes all those lovely VSTs you crack? (People that can code).

2>Who designs and builds all those lovely rack units you wish you had the money to buy? (Electrical engineers)

3>Who do you turn to when you're offered your first label release contract? (A solicitor)

4> Want to start or work for a label? (Labels sell a product. Sales and purchasing experience and an understanding of both economics and business law are going to be very fecking useful.)

5>Want serious money for events? (Hospitality and events management courses will help get you up to speed on the legal and practical aspects of putting on events larger than a local club night.)

6> Want to be a live sound engineer? (Serious knowledge of electronics will get you further than the ability to use a mixer in the long run.)

7>How much money do you think the owners of music technology stores make? (More than I do haha ;)) (Solid business skills are needed to setup and run a successful store.)

Etc etc blah blah. No offence meant.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know as much as many of you guys out there who have studied music tech at college. I learnt everything I know from reading books and mags + spending more hours than I care to calculate fucking about with kit....

contakt321 wrote:I have worked in the music industry (labels, distros, magazines, etc) for 10+ years and I think this is great advice.

I think getting a general degree us the way to go.

Supplement that with actually doing stuff. What I mean is, while you are in school, intern at a label, mastering house, etc or release a record, or do publicity work.

Contacts are very important, but initiative is the other important factor. Music industry folks dont just hands out jobs or money, to get a job, promotion or raise you just have to take action - that will earn you respect.

Sharmaji wrote:In all truth, futures hit the nail completely on the head. completely.

to it i'd add hustle your balls off, be working on some aspect of creating or marketing your music (and yourself) every single moment you're awake.

And don't be a tnuc about it.

justin roche wrote:hey, if i were you, I would save your money and use it to buy all the books on the market and good quality equipment.

Then spend as much time as possible reading the books, taking notes as you go (use OCR if you can and make your own book of all the best bits from the books).
Also, spend as much time as you can applying the knowledge that you learn with the equipment that you buy.

This is the way to get good.
If you still feel insecure about your knowledge / skill, then, perhaps try and get in contact with pro engineers and talk to them about it.
They may be able to give you a better perspective.

I remember before I took my degree in sound technology, I was very excited about going into a high spec studio.
Now that I have had the experience of 3 years using the high spec studios, I realize that my home studio is the place that I love to be in the most. No rules, my own equipment, no ass holes to give me attitude.

Also, I realize that now technology is so much cheaper, and software is so much more powerful. It is possible to achieve really good results in a good home / project studio.
At least up to a point.

Certainly for most dance music, you should be ok.
If you are really keen to get your tracks as perfect as possible, then perhaps consider paying for a pro mix engineer to mix your track and a good pro mastering engineer to master your track.

Otherwise, its all down to you learning, applying and buying.

Only do a degree if you want to be a teacher, paper don't mean nothing in the real world. Some pros, it actually goes against you.

Also, all that writing is horrible and takes you well away from music.
That sucks!!!

jackquinox wrote:I did Music Technology at college for a 2 year diploma then did a creative music and sound technology degree at leeds met and this is all i will say:

1: 90% of people on the course a male.
2: 50% of these believe they are the fucking muts nuts at everything they do and you will have to listen to them going on about how great they are all the time.
3: You will have the chance maybe once or twice to make a piece of music that you really want to make, but will normally be in the form of a remix or something like that, in my opinion leave your own music making to a home hobby and in uni and college concentrate on letting other peoples egos control what music gets made try and focus on learning about microphone placement or using the desk which leads me on to->
4: Everything you do is group work so find a good group of people with similar music tastes that will actualey turn up and share the responsabilites, in 5 years of doing music technology i got shown how to use a desk maybe once very briefly, lecturers really on the fact that some people know how to use a desk and some dont and those in the groups that do will take the lead, if you stuck me infront of a desk now i would probably still struggle to record anything.
5: These kind of courses are run by people that still work in the industry and not to stereotype but the fact is that when a sound engineer has children or some shit thats when they decide they need a steady income so they start teaching they dont really care if you learn they just like to tell your stories about recording with the stones etc etc.
6: I dont know anyone that did my course that now has a job in the industry, personally its alright for me because i found i really liked doing acoustics which is what i am now trying to pursue a career in but again i will need to do another year of education for a diploma in this, the things i liked the least where any of the recording things because it was always a pain in the arse.

Good luck to who ever is going to Leeds Met for me it was one of the most disorganised courses in creation and i know alot of other people that have done music tech courses at other universitys and told me the same thing, in my opinion do a degree thats worth while and keep music making to the bedroom unless you really want to get into sound engineering, acosutics or things like foley and sound design for film, be prepared to really push yourself to the front of the pack to get a chance to use the desks and have your ideas realised because what normally happens is that everyone will have an idea and then you will either end up with a shit pot of loads of different ideas or one loud mouth will make everyone submit to doing there thing which you will despise but in the interests of getting good marks you may aswell do it.

Rant over but i feel its good to point out things like this because i sometimes feel as if i was robbed of actually being taught anything in music technology.

thinking wrote:^^^ jacquinox summed it up beautifully there. I didn't go to Uni to study Music Tech, but I applied for and subsequently turned down 6 places on various courses, having decided each time that I actually didn't want to be stuck doing it for 3 years.


If you're serious about production, you'll spend the time learning yourself - this doesn't mean just sitting around writing beats, it means reading lots of books, and doing things properly. Set up a half-decent home studio with good monitors & acoustic treatment, give yourself a solid understanding and CONTROL of EQing and compression, etc etc.

There's very little you can't learn yourself, particularly if you're only interested in producing one particular kind of music, but you have to be serious about things if you're going to get there.

---------------------------------------------------

Related Links

making-a-living-from-being-a-producer-t102488.html
getting-into-the-industry-t103428.html
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=188454
music-production-uni-t28055.html?hilit=college
education-t35904.html?hilit=college
education-t35904.html
how-many-of-you-went-to-audio-engineering-school-t92509.html
post1066664.html?hilit=careers#p1066664
what-are-you-learning-now-what-are-you-going-to-learn-next-t51224.html

---------------------------------------------------

Thanks for reading!

Patrick :)
Last edited by futures_untold on Tue Mar 22, 2011 12:02 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby ketamine » Sat Jul 10, 2010 3:00 am

1st :D
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Postby Phigure » Sat Jul 10, 2010 3:45 am

You're pretty much one of the most informative posters on DSF

consistently putting out awesome shit
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Postby djake » Sat Jul 10, 2010 3:55 am

Phigure wrote:You're pretty much one of the most informative posters on DSF

consistently putting out awesome shit


this!

big up!
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Postby sixth sense » Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:14 am

I think I'm going here http://www.harboursideit.com/ next year we will see how interested I am then though :roll:
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Postby futures_untold » Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:06 am

Some people get a lot from studying music at college or uni.

My friend works with someone who is studyoing at Liverpool uni, and they are always busy with the amount of projects that are refered to him to work on.

Myfriend says that because he knows his stuff and has an ear for decent productions, he is well sought after.

So in the case of that guy, uni has helped him train up and to make professional links! :)

----------------------------------------------------------

I counter act that with another story.

My friend is studying Music Tech at Stafford uni which is good.

Yet I think his passion for trains (and transport in general) would more likely lead to decent paid work for him in the long run.

I'm hoping he'll do his train driving exams so he'll have a job for life!

:)

Swings and round-abouts.

You have to be really motivated to make studying pay off imo.

Patrick
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Postby jackquinox » Mon Jul 12, 2010 5:03 pm

Havent been on the forum for some time other than recentley to post a survey for my Acoustics Thesis but nice to see this thread up and I even get quoted in it, your right though for evey person like me that complains that its a waste of time there is someone else that has done alright although still in saying that there is still no one from my graduating year that I knew who has gone on to work in the industry?????
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Postby Depone » Mon Jul 12, 2010 5:21 pm

I personally felt it helped me to escape my situation of a shitty chef job and follow my own path... ie moved from my town to a new city, got a flat with a friend from saving up juuust enough to cover the first months rent and a deposit. It forced me to explore new territories and also to get a better job etc...

I actually feel its shaped me to be who and ware im at today... after all i have just been contacted by a legendary Dj and innovator, and asked to make a sample pack for a very well known sample pack provider (im not saying who just in case).
Would have not got that far without
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Postby Sharmaji » Mon Jul 12, 2010 5:27 pm

i'm actually completely FOR an education in music-- no matter what aspect of producing/recording/creating music you're involved in, being able to speak a shared language is only a good thing.

but like anything else, knowledge or talent alone doesn't get you anywhere. If you want to make it in music, more than nearly any other industry, it comes down to how hard you're will to work for yourself.
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Postby HAACK » Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:47 pm

Yhe I agree with Sharmaji, even if it isn't your career path you can still get a lot of knowledge that you wouldn't get form a book. I recently took an introductory course at my college in audio production, this helped me clarify so many questions and gave me a lot more tips that like I said you will not find in a book!

Plus you get to meet people that share similar interests and this makes for good connections in the future.

:D
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Postby gnome » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:49 pm

Great post as usual. Answered a lot of questions thanks Patrick
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Postby paravrais » Sat Jul 17, 2010 4:45 pm

This is something that's constantly a worry for me at the moment. Everyone always talks about how hard it is to make a living out of music and I don't really have a choice. Music is the *only* thing I can do. I'm literally shit at everything else and I'm very dedicated. I've never thought like "I'm gonna be Rusko" but I have been working towards the idea that if I made music and played as many gigs as possible then had a day job maybe producing for bands or making music for games/film/television etc or maybe teaching music then together I could make a decent living but now it seems everyone is saying that even *that* is unrealistic. I don't mind 'selling out' as it were because I really enjoy all kinds of music really and don't really care what my day job is as long as it's music/audio related and isn't advertising jingles.

I have no qualifications, can't afford to go to college and have no other skills. Basically I feel like i'm totally fucked now, i'm still gonna keep making music and trying to make money from it cos there's nothing else I *can* do but I feel like i'm destined to be stuck in retail earning under 10k a year for the rest of my miserable life :(

/depressing rant
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Postby JemGrover » Sat Jul 17, 2010 6:53 pm

paravrais wrote:This is something that's constantly a worry for me at the moment. Everyone always talks about how hard it is to make a living out of music and I don't really have a choice. Music is the *only* thing I can do. I'm literally shit at everything else and I'm very dedicated. I've never thought like "I'm gonna be Rusko" but I have been working towards the idea that if I made music and played as many gigs as possible then had a day job maybe producing for bands or making music for games/film/television etc or maybe teaching music then together I could make a decent living but now it seems everyone is saying that even *that* is unrealistic. I don't mind 'selling out' as it were because I really enjoy all kinds of music really and don't really care what my day job is as long as it's music/audio related and isn't advertising jingles.

I have no qualifications, can't afford to go to college and have no other skills. Basically I feel like i'm totally fucked now, i'm still gonna keep making music and trying to make money from it cos there's nothing else I *can* do but I feel like i'm destined to be stuck in retail earning under 10k a year for the rest of my miserable life :(

/depressing rant


Granted it's hard, but I bet you're a hell of a lot more capable then the majority of people working endless shifts in dead-end jobs who just go home and watch TV at the end of the day :D
When it comes to it, I reckon every "musician" ( or whatever ) has passion... which has to be better then an endless wakeup/go to work/repeat life, where the highlight of your day is clocking off.

And if anything, the "starving artist" angle is never a bad road in life, imo hahah. Have faith, man :D
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Postby Danger Co » Sat Jul 17, 2010 7:23 pm

Quality post, great to read about both sides of the coin.

I studied 1 semester of music tech and found it completely shite. As a mature student the class was filled with 'kids', and their variety of teen egos. The lecturers generally were not all that interested and typically just made ends meet to support out of class music commitments.

Fast fwd 5 years I'm now studying as a piano tech/tuner and have found it a more practical music industry job/passion.
There seems to be a shortage, so I will be able to find plenty of work.

In hindsight I'm glad piano tech is distant from my studio work, means that my passion wont become a job and the balance will stay sweet.

Realistically wouldnt most people get fed up editing audio etc for work and then going home to crank out your own tunes?? For me I'd rather keep them separate..
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Postby nowaysj » Sun Jul 18, 2010 6:53 am

futures_untold wrote:-Law (specialising in Contract Law)


In the states at least, I can strongly recommend against this. There is more production work right now than legal work.
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Postby Bodega » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:38 pm

I did a two-year program in recording at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario, Canada.

Twelve years later, I'd really recommend doing a good engineering program to learn the technical shit. It's made the stuff I make (like in my sig) infinitely better-sounding. Going to Fanshawe was one of the best decisions I've ever made. Not only do you learn stuff you want to learn, you learn stuff you didn't even realize you needed to know, like the importance of working *fast*. And you meet people that are completely different than who you'd meet from clubbing.

I'd be really careful about choosing a school, though. There were people in my classes who had already gone to other (one-year) recording schools before and realized that either they'd learned nothing or that they'd never work in a studio if they didn't go to Fanshawe, or both. My profs were mainly near-retirees who had worked for decades in music, which can give some amazing perspective. I'd avoid programs where the profs are *all* the same age as you, though obviously some young profs are good too.

But yeah, do it. Your sound is your sound. Knowing more about the technical shit only helps you present it better and work faster and with less aggro.
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Postby setspeed » Sun Jul 18, 2010 4:51 pm

paravrais wrote:This is something that's constantly a worry for me at the moment. Everyone always talks about how hard it is to make a living out of music and I don't really have a choice. Music is the *only* thing I can do. I'm literally shit at everything else and I'm very dedicated. I've never thought like "I'm gonna be Rusko" but I have been working towards the idea that if I made music and played as many gigs as possible then had a day job maybe producing for bands or making music for games/film/television etc or maybe teaching music then together I could make a decent living but now it seems everyone is saying that even *that* is unrealistic. I don't mind 'selling out' as it were because I really enjoy all kinds of music really and don't really care what my day job is as long as it's music/audio related and isn't advertising jingles.

I have no qualifications, can't afford to go to college and have no other skills. Basically I feel like i'm totally fucked now, i'm still gonna keep making music and trying to make money from it cos there's nothing else I *can* do but I feel like i'm destined to be stuck in retail earning under 10k a year for the rest of my miserable life :(


it *is* hard; put it this way - this year I will release about 40 tracks on labels from Earwax, to Boka, to Bass=Win to techno label CLR (under various names), I've got gigs from Denmark to Ukraine to Holland to Spain, and I will still earn a lot less than 10K.

That said, it IS possible to make a living. There is good money in music for TV adverts, film and stuff, but because of this it's very very difficult to get the work. Teaching instruments is a better bet; you can charge 20 quid an hour so if you can get a dozen pupils you can get by.

Basically, you just have to throw yourself into it. Get rid of your TV, throw out your bong, ditch the social life for a year or so and start putting the hours in. It's a shitter but there is no shortcut these days!*

*unless you are Rusko or Joker etc. In which case, all you have to do is invent a new subgenre that is massively successful :D
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Postby paravrais » Sun Jul 18, 2010 6:24 pm

setspeed wrote:
paravrais wrote:This is something that's constantly a worry for me at the moment. Everyone always talks about how hard it is to make a living out of music and I don't really have a choice. Music is the *only* thing I can do. I'm literally shit at everything else and I'm very dedicated. I've never thought like "I'm gonna be Rusko" but I have been working towards the idea that if I made music and played as many gigs as possible then had a day job maybe producing for bands or making music for games/film/television etc or maybe teaching music then together I could make a decent living but now it seems everyone is saying that even *that* is unrealistic. I don't mind 'selling out' as it were because I really enjoy all kinds of music really and don't really care what my day job is as long as it's music/audio related and isn't advertising jingles.

I have no qualifications, can't afford to go to college and have no other skills. Basically I feel like i'm totally fucked now, i'm still gonna keep making music and trying to make money from it cos there's nothing else I *can* do but I feel like i'm destined to be stuck in retail earning under 10k a year for the rest of my miserable life :(


it *is* hard; put it this way - this year I will release about 40 tracks on labels from Earwax, to Boka, to Bass=Win to techno label CLR (under various names), I've got gigs from Denmark to Ukraine to Holland to Spain, and I will still earn a lot less than 10K.

That said, it IS possible to make a living. There is good money in music for TV adverts, film and stuff, but because of this it's very very difficult to get the work. Teaching instruments is a better bet; you can charge 20 quid an hour so if you can get a dozen pupils you can get by.

Basically, you just have to throw yourself into it. Get rid of your TV, throw out your bong, ditch the social life for a year or so and start putting the hours in. It's a shitter but there is no shortcut these days!*

*unless you are Rusko or Joker etc. In which case, all you have to do is invent a new subgenre that is massively successful :D



This isn't a problem for me, I have no social life anymore as almost everyone I know has moved away in recent years. I gave up weed at the start of this year and don't drink or do any other drugs anymore either. I quit my job not too long ago and spend 9-5 working solely on music now almost every day. I don't mind if it's hard, infact I don't think I want it to be easy. I've often thought that i'd spend my 20s trying to make a living solely off making music and then around when I hit 30 carry on but take up teaching as well to pay the bills properly.

I'm fully prepared to do masses of PR for myself, spend countless days on the road touring and promoting and even making more 'poppy' music or producing for bands on the side isn't a problem for me. I guess we will see in the end. Either i'll be poor forever but have an interesting life or i'll make a decent living and have an even more amazing life. Beats being an accountant and killing myself..

At this stage I don't have a choice anyway so I need to give it my best shot lol
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Postby selhurstwunderkid » Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:53 pm

Stay away mate, it will eat you up and unless you are extremely fortunate or in the right place at the right time then your love of music will be fucked. It happened to me and im now only just back at a place after nearly a decade where i can happily make music just for the love.
But heh, if you really want to do it then move to London and do work experience for free. If you have the talent, and most importantly the personality that fits in the business, then you may stand a chance of being offered a role if and when it opens.
Then snap it up, network all you can, still offer your self for free in your spare time, you want it right?, to get more experience. Get used to living in doss holes and eating shite, coz you need your small amount of income to be out there "mingling" drinking and the various other substances that you will be expected to partake in so your on the pulse of whats gwanning.
Do this for many years, hope and pray something happens for you and do not be distracted by your mates who are starting to settle down, own houses, flat screen teles, you know that list in trainspotting.
If you can do that, then congratulations, you are REALLY passionate about music and you deserve to make it, but that dont mean shite coz the world of minimum wage in London is full of creative failures angry with the world and thierselves for why it all went tits up. But for them there is always the super T .
Haha i sound like a right miserable fucker, but hey thats just my experience. It all depends on what you want out of life, if its really for you then at least give it a shot and see.
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Postby paravrais » Mon Jul 19, 2010 12:27 am

selhurstwunderkid wrote:Stay away mate, it will eat you up and unless you are extremely fortunate or in the right place at the right time then your love of music will be fucked. It happened to me and im now only just back at a place after nearly a decade where i can happily make music just for the love.
But heh, if you really want to do it then move to London and do work experience for free. If you have the talent, and most importantly the personality that fits in the business, then you may stand a chance of being offered a role if and when it opens.
Then snap it up, network all you can, still offer your self for free in your spare time, you want it right?, to get more experience. Get used to living in doss holes and eating shite, coz you need your small amount of income to be out there "mingling" drinking and the various other substances that you will be expected to partake in so your on the pulse of whats gwanning.
Do this for many years, hope and pray something happens for you and do not be distracted by your mates who are starting to settle down, own houses, flat screen teles, you know that list in trainspotting.
If you can do that, then congratulations, you are REALLY passionate about music and you deserve to make it, but that dont mean shite coz the world of minimum wage in London is full of creative failures angry with the world and thierselves for why it all went tits up. But for them there is always the super T .
Haha i sound like a right miserable fucker, but hey thats just my experience. It all depends on what you want out of life, if its really for you then at least give it a shot and see.


No offense, but if that didn't work for you then maybe that isn't the right course of action to take XD theres no way in hell i'm going to london, theres no way i'm going to start taking drugs again and i've been brought up in shit holes so that's hardly anything new to me. I'm going to spend the next few years making music, mixing and studying PR. I'm going to shut myself away untill I have something beautiful and then tour around trying to make a name.

I only have two options, go back to retail and just stay there forever or give this a shot. I certainly know which looks more appealing to me right now.
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